Google launches Titan security key with NFC, stops selling Bluetooth version

A few years back, Google introduced a new version of its Titan security key with a USB-C connector, built in collaboration with Yubico. The Bluetooth-enabled security key is designed to help consumers protect themselves from targeted attacks such as phishing.

Today, Google updated its Titan security key lineup with only two options, removing the Bluetooth version from its offerings. From August 10, the search giant will begin offering the security key with either a USB-A connector or USB-C, both of which feature NFC for two-factor authentication.

It’s worth noting that, in the past, only the USB-A variant supported NFC. In the updated lineup, the USB-C version has added support for this type of wireless standard, making it a lot easier to choose between USB-C and USB-A, depending on what ports your device has.

If you have the Bluetooth version already, Google promises that it will continue to work with Bluetooth or as an NFC key on “most modern mobile devices”. The company will also honor existing warranties for Bluetooth Titan security keys within their terms.

The security key essentially works to keep your account secure when you log into services like Google, Dropbox, Facebook, Twitter, and others that support the FIDO compliance. This means that even if an attacker has access to your login details, they won’t be able to access your account. The security key is supported by all major platforms including Windows, Android, Linux, Chrome OS, and macOS.

For those who have devices built with USB-A ports, Google recommends the USB-A with NFC security key while the USB-C with NFC security key is recommended for those with devices USB-C ports. You can purchase the USB-A key for $30, complete with a USB-A to USB-C adapter. The USB-C key will retail for $35 via the Google Store.

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